Great, big, wide healthcare world – Chiropractor

January 19, 2015

What is chiropractic medicine?

Doctors of chiropractic frequently treat individuals with neuromusculoskeletal complaints, such as headaches, joint pain, neck pain, low back pain and sciatica. Chiropractors also treat patients with osteoarthritis, spinal disk conditions, carpal tunnel syndrome, tendonitis, sprains, and strains. However, the scope of conditions that Doctors of chiropractic manage or provide care for is not limited to neuromusculoskeletal disorders. Chiropractors have the training to treat a variety of non-neuromusculoskeletal conditions such as: allergies, asthma, digestive disorders, otitis media (non-suppurative) and other disorders as new research is developed. (ACAtoday.org)

What’s the path to becoming a chiropractor?

4 years of pre-medical undergraduate college education, including courses in biology, inorganic and organic chemistry, physics, psychology and related lab work and 4 -5 years of chiropractic school, followed by obtaining state licensure.

How many accredited chiropractic colleges are there? Where are they located?

There are 18 schools with locations across the country.

http://www.acatoday.org/content_css.cfm?CID=32

How do I learn more?

http://www.acatoday.org/students/index.cfm

Resources

American Chiropractic Association


Last Minute Summer Opportunities

January 15, 2015

Maximizing your summer vacation by participating in some meaningful clinical experience, research, test prep, etc is an important part of the application process to professional school.  By now, you should have explored and applied to options for programs for the upcoming summer.  If not, here are a few experiences that still have open deadlines.  It’s still not too late find mission trips, or contact a local healthcare professional / family member to arrange for shadowing, or employment in a healthcare related field ( medical office receptionist, scribe at a local hospital, patient care assistant at a local hospital, volunteer at a local hospital).

 

Other options for meaningful summer experience include:

– shadowing a physician ( for a sustained, and regular period of time, at least once per week)

– mission work

– volunteering at a health related facility ( for a sustained and regular period of time, at least once per week)

– working as a patient care assistant at a hospital

– working as a scribe at a hospital

– taking classes during the summer to improve your GPA and decrease your academic load during the upcoming semester.

If you must work to assist your family financially, and cannot find a job in a healthcare related field, make sure to find some time to incorporate some activities that will be helpful towards your application, be that shadowing, a short mission trip, etc.

 

DEADLINES ARE APPROACHING, DO NOT DELAY TO REVIEW AND APPLY FOR THESE OPPORTUNITIES! The deadines for these opportunities are approaching, but have not yet passed.  

http://sackler.tufts.edu/Admissions/Apply-to-Non-Degree-Programs/Building-Diversity-in-Biomedical-Sciences.aspx

http://pritzker.uchicago.edu/about/diversity/pipeline/camp.shtml

http://www.einstein.yu.edu/uploadedFiles/education/md-program/diversity/2014%20DSSROP%20-%20Application.pdf (This application is for 2014, check the school’s website to see if this program is being offered this summer)

http://www6.miami.edu/provost/oae/motivationprogram.html ( contact oae@mia.edu to see if this program is available for summer 2015)

http://www.mplsheart.org/get-involved/internships/research-internship/overview/ (DEADLINE IS JAN. 31, 2015)

http://www.rowan.edu/coopermed/diversity/undergrad/ ( DEADLINE FEB 13, 2015)

http://coe.stanford.edu/pre-med/sshcop.html

Contact: sshcop@gmail.com to see if this opportunity is available for summer 2015)

http://biosciences.stanford.edu/prospective/diversity/ssrp/docs/SSRP_Brochure_2014.pdf ( For students pursuing PhD)

http://louisville.edu/medicine/diversity/student-pipeline-programs/mcat-dat-training-conference-for-undergraduates

http://smdep.org/apply-to-smdep/

http://www.colorado.edu/GraduateSchool/DiversityInitiative/undergrads/smart/index.html ( Contact one of the emails listed to obtain application materials for this summer)

http://www.medicine.virginia.edu/education/phd/gpo/srip

http://www.rackham.umich.edu/prospective-students/srop/application-process

http://www.uthsc.edu/HCP/descriptions.php

http://graduate.ucsf.edu/srtp (for students pursuing PhD.)

http://www.cincinnatichildrens.org/education/research/surf/apply/

http://med.uc.edu/SURF/experience

http://www.medstudent.ucla.edu/offices/aeo/prep.cfm

http://www.lsuhscshreveport.edu/multiculturalaffairs/efpform.aspx

https://www.training.nih.gov/programs/sip

http://www.pathwaystoscience.org/Institution.aspx?sort=Institution&subsort=NIH

 

Extensive List of 2015 Summer Opportunities   (some deadlines may have passed, you will need to sort through the list to find opportunities that may interest you. The list is large. One way to narrow down would be by region/location, or you can sort through the list alphabetically and check the deadlines.)

http://people.rit.edu/gtfsbi/Symp/premed.htm

 

*Remember, if you must work to assist your family financially, and cannot find a job in a healthcare related field, make sure to find some time to incorporate some activities that will be helpful towards your application, be that shadowing, a short mission trip, etc.*

 

 


Sophomore Spring Timeline

January 11, 2015

Sophomore Spring Timeline

–       Seek out opportunities for leadership on campus, preferably in an organization associated with your field of interest, but truly, any leadership role on campus will be regarded positively on your application.

–       Keep your grades up!  A strong academic record is an vital part of a competitive application.

–       Finalize your summer plans!!!!  If you don’t have any plans, make some immediately. Many students devote the summer after their sophomore year to test preparation, research, regular shadowing etc.  The bottom line is to use this valuable time well!  You do not want to be sitting at home doing nothing, or working at the Gap so you can get a good discount.  This time is for doing something that will support your application to medical, dental, graduate, pharmacy school etc.  There are many PAID research opportunities available but deadlines have past or are fast approaching so, if you have no plans lined up, find some now!

Seek out opportunities to demonstrate your interest in the field of your choice. Shadowing and volunteering during this time period will also help those who are still undecided about which path to take.

Continue working on an activity journal where you document the health related activities you have participated in. This will serve as a good foundation when you prepare to write your personal statement. Start your journal now, and keep adding it to as you engage in a new activity.

If you are planning to attend medical school, start working on and updating the Works and Activities worksheet. The works and activities worksheet is an important part of the AMCAS application. See the link to a blank works and activities form below.

 

Additional information and resources

AAMC overview of Works and Activities section: 

Tips for writing your most meaningful experiences description

Sample Entries for AMCAS Works and Activities Form

Activities and Work -edited

 


Spring Semester Freshman Timeline

January 11, 2015

FRESHMAN YEAR SPRING TIMELINE

Contrary to popular belief, preparing for admission to the prehealth school of your choice doesn’t start in one’s junior year.  For you guys, it starts right now!  The habits you form or break now, and energy and work you put in during these two very important years will help to propel you to the future you desire as a full fledged doctor / dentist / chiropractor / pharmacist / epidemiologist, etc etc.  Make this time count!  Use these years well, and the requirements during your junior and senior years will be so much easier.

– Keep those grades up. Last semester you had a chance to see how different studying in college is from studying in high school. By now, you should have an idea of what study techniques work and which ones don’t. Continue to hone those skills, as they will be useful to you throughout the rest of your academic career.

Seek out opportunities to demonstrate your interest in the field of your choice. Shadowing and volunteering during this time period will also help those who are still undecided about which path to take.

Finalize your plans for the summer! Apply to summer programs that provide research experience, exposure to the health professions.  Be sure to select summer opportunities or research programs that are related to your field of interest.  If you opt for a program that is not overtly medical, be sure to pursue something that demonstrate a prolonged interest in another activity, but still make time for something healthcare related as well.

-Consider working as a CNA, scribe, phlebotomist, or volunteering at a hospital, clinic during the summer. This will provide exposure to the medical field.

Start working on an activity journal where you document the health related activities you have participated in. This will serve as a good foundation when you prepare to write your personal statement. Start your journal now, and keep adding it to as you engage in a new activity.

How to keep an activity journal

 


MCAT Study Tips

November 10, 2014

MCAT Study Tips

  1. UNDERSTAND THE IMPORTANCE OF THIS TEST

Doing well on this test is important! It is not the only factor that determines a successful application to medical school, but it is a very important part of the application. Doing well on this test isnNot only for securing admission, but for securing admission and increasing potential for scholarships.   The cost of any MCAT prep course, qbank, or resource you purchase is an investment into your future. This is not the time to be economical. Paying $2000 for a live Kaplan class, could secure you the score that results in a full scholarship to medical school! It is well worth it.

 

  1. KNOW WHATS ON THE TEST

Before you can actually start studying for the test, you need to know the content.   Most students know that the MCAT tests knowledge of biology, chemistry, organic chemistry and physics, however, that’s not enough to know. It’s important to know specifically what concepts from those subjects you are responsible for knowing. Knowing the specifics will guide your studying. The AAMC details the specific subject matter that will be tested on the exam.

What’s on the MCAT 2015

COMPLETE MCAT 2015 content description:    (YOU MAY BE TEMPTED TO NOT LOOK AT THIS, DON’T YIELD TO THE TEMPTATION. KNOWING WHAT’S ACTUALLYO N THE TEST IS WELL WORTH YOUR TIME. IF THE AAMC THOUGHT IT WAS NECESSARY TO PRODUCE A 120+ PAGE DOCUMENT WITH WHAT’S ON THE TEST, IT BEHOOVES YOU TO LOOK AT IT)

 

  1. SET OUT TIME TO STUDY.

It’s recommended that students devote 4 – 6 months to prep for the exam.

Arrange your academic schedule so you have adequate time to study. As much as is possible take a lighter courseload during the semester during which you will be studying for the test. So, if your schedule for next semester has more than 15 credits, and the majority of those credits are science courses, consider swapping one for a general education/ prerequisite that will be not take up too much of your time. Plan to study every day and devote more time on the weekends.

 

  1. PREPARE MENTALLY

You will need to prepare mentally before you embark on this journey. The preparation isn’t just for you, its for your friends a nd family who will neglect for the 4-6 months during which you will be studying.   You have to be diligent about your MCAT study time; it can’t be negotiable.

 

5.  DECIDE WHEN YOU’RE TAKING THE TEST

There are 14 test dates for the 2015 MCAT, from April to September, attached is a copy of the schedule  and when scores will be released.  A select few of you may be able to take the May test, but that would require you to prepare NOW! If your schedule for the upcoming spring semester doesn’t permit ample time to study for they test, do not plan to take it ” and see what happens”. It is doable to get good preparation in between November and May, but you would just have to be diligent, disciplined and start now and have a schedule that would permit that.

 

If you are considering taking the July/ August test

1.  What else do you have planned for the summer? As much as possible, try to dedicate the whole summer to those final 2 months of test prep.  ( I say final two months of test prep because you should not be starting to study for the test during the summer.  If you can remotely afford not to work, don’t work.  I would not plan to do research during this time.  One feasible option to consider is to get some shadowing experience in. Anything other than that may prove to be too time consuming and will take you away from studying for the test.

2.  How will you study?  Prep class or on your own with materials.  If financially feasible, I would recommend a prep class.  The investment is worth it.

 

If you  are considering taking the May test

1.  Will you have a light enough schedule to study during spring semester?  If you won’t have time to study, don’t plan to take the test.

2. Is it more important to you to have the opportunity to take the test again or to have more time to prepare?  Keep in mind that there will only be about 9 weeks from the time the May MCAT scores come out (on June 30) and when the September** test is administered, so if you’re thinking that taking it in May gives you time to retake the test; it does, but there will only be about 9 weeks, so there really won’t that that much time to study.  There would only be time to address areas where you had specific deficits.

**I say September test, because by there is a possibility that by the time the May scores come out on June 30, there may not be enough time to register for the August test.  Registration dates have not yet been published**

 

6. MAKE A SCHEDULE!

In order to know where you’re going you need some direction, a roadmap, a guide. Same with MCAT studying. You can’t just decide, OK, today I’m going to study biology and then pick up your book , read for 2 hours and then close it. In order to cover all the concepts tested, it’s important to know what you specifically aim to cover within a period of time ( per day  or per week) You can create a weekly schedule, or you can go further and plan out what you hope to cover every day.   I would recommend studying for at least one solid hours per day with more on weekends and during breaks.  Utilize test prep materials now concurrently as you do your coursework.

 

7. DO TONS OF QUESTIONS

Do tons of questions, and then do them again. You want to familiarize yourself with the test, the testing environment and the material. Kaplan, Princeton Review, Exam Krackers all offer an online question bank. I would recommend that students buy the qbank in about 6 months before you hope to take the test and work on the questions during the school year. I would also recommend incorporating full length practice tests into your study schedule, especially as the actual test date nears and in light of the fact that test is about 7.5 hours long.  There is currently a full length new MCAT practice test on the AAMC website. I would do it, and do it again, and do it again. An additional one will be available in the new year.

 

8.  USE YOUR TEST PREP MATERIALS NOW

Use your test prep materials for your current coursework.  That way you familiarize yourself with the information and can apply the concepts to what you’re currently doing in class.  Obtain test prep materials during Thanksigiving and christmas break and use them along with text books and other resources now and during the spring semester.

 

To Do List

– Obtain the AAMC official MCAT 2015 guide

– Order Kaplan / Princeton Review / Exam Crackers Online course or plan to take a live course during the summer.

(Kaplan has live classes that you can attend online, that start as early as November 15th)

– Get a qbank

– Obtain the AAMC MCAT 2015 Practice test

– Set up a schedule

 


Prepping for the MCAT 2015

November 5, 2014

Current juniors who are preparing to apply to medical school during the Summer of 2015, with hopes of starting professional school in August 2016 are faced with the unique challenge of the “new MCAT”.

As most of you know, the MCAT is changing in length, content, and scoring.   The first administration of the new MCAT will be April 2015, with 14 scheduled test dates, between April 2015 and September 2015. One important question many students have is : how will I gain knowledge of the new subjects that will be represented on the test. Here are a few options and resources.

 

General Test Prep Recommendations

– For junior students planning to take the May or August exam, I would recommend that you obtain test prep materials to use during the school year.  Have a lighter load for the upcoming spring semester to allow yourself time to be able to study adequately for the test.   Take tons of practice questions / tests!  One deterrent for students when considering test prep materials is cost.  This is an investment in your future!  The cost of an MCAT prep course, question bank, books, etc.  will be well worth it when you secure a stellar score and are offered a scholarship for medical school 🙂

Here are a few resources:

  1. *MCAT Foundations In Biochemistry and Behavioral Sciences Course *

– Option for junior students who have not yet taken biochemistry and are planning to apply for medical school in Summer 2015.

– Online course

– Cost: $1099

– Course is offered in two segments from October 28, 2014 – March 7, 2015

 

  1. Khan Academy Video Series

– Especially prepared to fill the gaps in the knowledge base of students preparing to take the new MCAT, since new material is being covered.

– Created the Khan academy in conjunction with the AAMC

 

  1. Practice tests for the new MCAT

AAMC MCAT 2015 practice test

– Full length test with answers and explanations

– Second full length practice test will be available in 2015

AAMC MCAT 2015 Information guide with 120 practice questions and answers

– Available as a supplement of the MCAT 2015 information guide and also available separately for $10.

 

4. Meded icollaborative lectures

 

Additional Resources

AAMC: How to I prepare for the 2015 MCAT

FAQs about the MCAT 2015

Biochemistry Lecture Series

Biochemistry of Premeds

Knowledge Map Concepts for the 2015 MCAT content

 

 

 

 


Senior year timeline and interview questions

September 15, 2014

I had the pleasure of speaking at last week’s OBMA meeting. Heres some of the valuable information you missed.  Dr. Vanterpool and Dr. Moss provided their insights as well!  Please make an effort to attend the meetings arranged for your benefit!

For seniors, your prime focus is getting your AMCAS or AASDAS applications sent out, and preparing for interviews.  Attached you’ll find your tips and some questions for both traditional and MMI type interviews.

OU Fall Timeline – Senior

Feel free to contact us at healthou.org@gmail.com, with any questions.


Junior Year Timeline and Supplements

September 15, 2014

I had the pleasure of speaking at last week’s OBMA meeting. Heres some of the valuable information you missed.  Dr. Vanterpool and Dr. Moss provided their insights as well!  Please make an effort to attend the meetings arranged for your benefit!

Juniors, this is an important year for you, tons to be done!. Two areas of emphasis for you are:  AMCAS activities and work page, and your personal statement. Attached are some questions to consider before you begin to write your personal statement and a sample AMCAS, activities and work experience page. The AMCAS activities and work experience section is a daunting section that will take more time than you think.  One way to save yourself the hassle is to start compiling a list of applicable experiences AS YOU DO THEM, rather than waiting till fall of your senior year to try and remember all the activities you participated in.  Attached is a sample activities and work page that you can save on your desktop and update as you engage in an extracurricular activity, while the number of house, project leader, and contact info, etc are still available .  Also, you can begin to reflect on the activities and start brainstorming ideas for a personal statement. Trust me, needing to fill out AMCAS is closer than you think!

 

 


Sophomore Timeline and Sample AMCAS Activities Page

September 15, 2014

I had the pleasure of speaking at last week’s OBMA meeting. Heres some of the valuable information you missed.  Dr. Vanterpool and Dr. Moss provided their insights as well!  Please make an effort to attend the meetings arranged for your benefit!

For sophomores, one additional focus for you should be beginning to/ continuing to be involved in extracurricular activities. The AMCAS activities and work experience section is a daunting section that will take more time than you think.  One way to save yourself the hassle is to start compiling a list of applicable experiences AS YOU DO THEM, rather than waiting till fall of your senior year to try and remember all the activities you participated in.  Attached is a sample activities and work page that you can save on your desktop and update as you engage in an extracurricular activity, while the number of house, project leader, and contact info, etc are still available .  Also, you can begin to reflect on the activities and start brainstorming ideas for a personal statement. Trust me, needing to fill out AMCAS is closer than you think!

 

OU Fall Timeline – Sophomore

Please feel free to contact us at healthou.org@gmail.com with any questions.


Freshman Timeline and Study Tips

September 15, 2014

I had the pleasure of speaking at last week’s OBMA meeting. Heres some of the valuable information you missed.  Dr. Vanterpool and Dr. Moss provided their insights as well!  Please make an effort to attend the meetings.  Valuable information is shared that you don’t want to miss.

OU Fall Timeline – Freshman